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Coaching and Mentoring Services

Essentially, mentoring allows one person, with knowledge and experience, to guide and support another. It does not matter whether your experience has been positive as we can all learn as much from our mistakes as our successes.

What is Mentoring?

Mentoring is defined as a voluntary, mutually beneficial relationship in which an individual, that already has some experience of studying at the university, offers their time to support another student and help them to navigate their way through similar challenges.


The  Mentoring service has two strategies to provide one to one support:

Mentoring is offered through drop-in sessions which are available daily to all students, from enrolment to professional life. The drop-ins are run by consultants and the mentoring team coordinators. They act as mentors, offering guidance and support to help with any aspect of a student’s experience that is causing concern or confusion. No appointment is necessary and the drop-ins run daily continuing by appointment over the launch break.

 

While this is a very popular service, used by both mentors and mentees, many students also want the support of a peer mentor. The transition to being a professional, and progressing through each level of study, can be very challenging and having the support of a peer mentor, who has already had this experience, can make a real difference. This is an opportunity that allows you, the mentor, to use your own experience of being a student to help improve the experience of a mentee following in your footsteps and working at a level below you.


Also, have alumnae who volunteer to be alumni mentors and, if registered with the Welfare Service, volunteers who offer to peer mentor other undergraduates registered with Well-being.

Many people who have experienced the support of a mentor say it has marked a turning point in their life, helping them to build new networks of support, increase their self-confidence, develop new skills and change their life for the better.  if you wish to be Coach & Mentor, we have full training available F2F, Online, and Distance learning contact us now, at:atheibmc@gmail.com

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What does a mentor NOT offer a mentee?


By having a clearer overview of the course, a mentor can do a great deal to support the mentees approach to study and assignments and establish goals and a sense of direction. However, it is important to ensure that the mentor does not get too closely involved in the mentees academic work or make decisions for them. Rather than creating a dependency the mentoring scheme pairings aim to empower students so that the mentee develops their own skills and understanding and can go on to work independently with confidence.


While a mentor can be highly supportive, they are not expected to act as a counsellor. Sometimes a mentee may share personal information with their mentor because they have learnt to feel comfortable interacting with them. If this information is something that causes concern (see Confidentiality and Boundaries section) we would ask you to encourage them to speak to someone who is in a position to help at the academy.  


This has a counselling and a well-being service, both run by trained professionals. You can also suggest that the mentee discuss any issues with a member of the mentoring team as they are fully aware of how the university a student with problems or concerns.

As a final thought, a mentor is not expected to take the place of a lecturer and should never produce work for their mentee.


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What does a mentor offer a mentee?


Having a mentor can really help a mentee to explore options, gain practical advice, develop social and academic confidence and form strategies for dealing with any challenges faced. A peer mentor can really enhance the university experience of another student by reducing their stress levels and increasing their mentees confidence and self-esteem.


Having already progressed further on the course, the mentor can offer advice and tips, based on their own experiences and observation. These may relate to budgeting, adapting to the environment, enhancing study skills, raising awareness of available services, clubs and facilities, reassuring the mentee that it is quite normal to find aspects of their experience challenging and exploring ways for them to progress confidently.


Ending the mentoring relationship

A good reason for making the mentor relationship time limited at the start is that there is clarity about how long the support is there for. This doesn’t mean that the relationship can’t continue. It just requires a new request to be made and for both parties to agree. Also, if the relationship doesn’t work out don’t feel trapped. Changes can be made. It may be that timings don’t fit both parties’ timetables so another mentor or mentee might work better. This is not a problem at all so please speak to the coordinator or a member of the mentoring team as soon as concerns arise.


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How often do we need to be in contact?


Peer mentoring is flexible and arranged around the availability and needs of both parties. We don’t dictate exactly when you have contact or for how long, but if there is a long silence, with no contact or meeting, a mentee may not feel adequately supported. We would suggest that every 2 to 3 weeks is ideal for contact. Most mentor pairs find their own pattern and recognise times of greater and lesser need. Even a brief email to see how the mentee is getting on can be experienced as supportive.


One of the first things we suggest you do is compare academic diaries to identify times when both parties will be very busy, or both parties are fairly available.

A mentoring relationship will be different for each pair of students and can last for just one semester or for an entire academic year. Again, it is important to be flexible and work around the needs of those involved.


Some mentor relationships have continued beyond a year because they work so well and are experienced positively by both the mentor and mentee. Others have been just as positive but shorter due to the mentee reaching a level of confidence that means they don’t feel the need of further support. Either example is fine because they meet the needs of the mentor.

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When mentoring a new pupil, it can be very helpful to recall your own experience of starting University.

  • What challenges did you face?
  • What questions did you want to ask other mentees?
  • What was your best experience?
  • What was your worst experience?
  • Did anything surprise you?
  • What advice would you give to yourself if you could turn back the clock?


It is worth remembering that everyone is different and will have had a personal journey that has brought them to make the choice to come and study at academy A few examples follow:

        

  • Different ages and starting points for their degree course –a student may be young and following on directly from school or college. Others may be mature students and not have studied for many years. Others may have been unemployed prior to deciding to go for a degree while others may have been working successfully in a completely different field of work. Some students have focussed on parenting and have only just found the available time to begin a degree.

 

 

  • Different backgrounds – this can refer to nationality, culture or financial backgrounds and can impact in a number of ways. A learner coming from abroad will probably face additional challenges as they will need to settle in a new city as well as a new country and educational setting. Most new learners, whatever their background, will be studying at a new level unless they are on a postgraduate course. Financially, some students will need to work while they study and some may be single parents caring for children while they study and, sometimes, working too.

 

  • Different motivations/goals – some students come to academy hoping to leave with a First Class degree or as close to it as possible. Others are less concerned with the class of degree obtained but want the satisfaction of obtaining a degree or need a degree to progress in their area of work.

 

  • Different levels of confidence – Coming to university can be daunting, especially for first-generation students, mature students or those who have not studied for some time. Often these people believe they will be alone in this position so mentors can do a lot to reassure incoming students that this won’t be the case.

 

this is proud of the diversity of their learners and recognises that they all have varying aims, challenges and needs. The mentoring service allows mentees to receive the specific guidance they require through the support provided.

Mentoring service aims?


The mentoring service aims to help undergraduates adapt to the environment around them, increase their confidence and ensure that students gain the maximum from their university experience. This support can continue from enrolment through each level of study, and on to graduation.

 

As a mentor, you can gain personal satisfaction and valuable experience through providing support to another student. You can also gain transferable skills that enhance your CV as peer mentoring is highly valued by many employers.


Whether pupils are coming from school, unemployment, college, parenting or work, the transition to university can be very challenging and having the support of a mentor can make a real difference. This is an opportunity that allows you to use your own experience of being a student to help improve the experience of a student following in your footsteps.


Confidentiality and Boundaries

 

Within any kind of mentoring, understanding confidentiality and boundaries is highly important.


Confidentiality between a mentor and mentee involves respecting that what is shared during the mentoring sessions is not shared or discussed outside of the meeting. The only exception to this is if the mentor feels, through what the mentee has shared, that there is a risk of harm to the mentee or to others, especially kids. In such a case we would ask that a mentor speaks to a member of the mentoring team so that appropriate action could be taken and so that the mentoring team can be sure that there is support in place at this time.

Boundaries can be personal and physical. When meeting face to face we always ask mentor pairs to meet in a public place and never to meet at either home address, even in the halls of residence.


The reading room or a quiet space at the private office is usually a good space. However, the personal boundaries apply in both online and face to face mentoring. This will include not sharing personal information but if mentors decide to share a mobile number we suggest waiting until they are sure they feel comfortable about this. Time boundaries are important - so be clear about when you will and won’t be able to respond. The mentor needs to be able to manage their own demands well and the mentoring relationship should not become a barrier to this.


If you have any concerns or feel uncomfortable about the mentoring at any point please do not hesitate to speak to the mentoring consultant.


The mentoring team aims to cover what is and isn’t expected by asking that, at the first meeting of a new pairing, they come to a brief meeting with the coordinator or one of the mentoring team. This also allows us to introduce the mentee to the mentor and any questions can be asked. We hope to introduce training sessions for the mentee, so they have a clearer understanding of what we aim to offer and what is appropriate.


On-going support from the mentoring team


If you have any concerns please feel free to discuss them with the mentoring team as we provide on-going support for all involved. Do not keep any questions or worries to yourself and you can always use the Drop-in service yourselves. It is there for every student, whether mentee, mentor or in a pairing.

Why we want coaching? 


Why is actual coaching the important to executive achievement in the current time frame. The purpose is modest – the character of executives have transformed essentially over the past period and a innovative method to individuals supervision is essential for

businesses to do well.


In history the development of coaching has been influenced by numerous other arenas of training as well as individuals of particular progress, adult teaching, rational (sports, medical, developmental, organizational, social and business) and further executive or leadership theories and practices.


Meanwhile the end of 90s, coaching has advanced into a extra self-determining correction and professional affiliates have facilitated to develop a traditional of training values.

Coaching is not just an additional form of supervision or management.  As will see, the important to positive coaching depends on the character’s will and aptitude to recognize their individual capabilities or faults and to take action as desired. The coach can’t just communicate the individual what to do, nor can the specific develop too dependent on the coach’s opinions and proposals.  The individual essential be a dynamic member in the development at all times and accept ultimate accountability

What is coaching skills


Although many individuals train as professional coaches, with a number of courses, being university accredited starting from basic certificated training through to that of PhD, the basic skills of coaching are now often taught to managers in the form of two to four-day training programmes.


As a coach, you have to control your emotions.  There will be more negative aspects than positive things sometimes.

At present, these include Transpersonal, Solution Focused Coaching, Cognitive-Behavioral and Co-Active.

Coaching is a business. You need to sell yourself, schedule your time, invoice clients, pay taxes and so on. This need not be complex for a business of one person.


A few decades back managers were allowed to undergo “counselling” session. However, the term ‘counselling’ was often felt to be an inappropriate one as it tended to suggest that those who would benefit from such interventions, were linked to the needs of a clinical population. It is the duty of the coach to keep the deep and dark secrets within them and they should not share this even with their life partner.


The term coaching has none of these negative connotations and is regarded as a way of helping individuals to maximize their performance.

There is a number of approaches to coaching.

To be a good coach, you should have a good rapport and connect to other people at a personal level.  Coaching is not for introverts. Whilst connecting with others, you also need to be able to stand back and look critically at them, seeing their inner issues and the way forward for them.


if you and your team required our services as Coach & Mentor (Business & Career)please feel free to drop the line, one of our consultants will contact you ASAP  at: atheibmc@gmail.com

Online Mentoring and Online Net-equate

 

When not meeting, physically, there are no body language cues to help you to be sure that you have understood your mentees question or that they have understood the meaning of your reply, so your written responses need to be carefully constructed to convey your meaning clearly. We don’t want to make you feel this is meant to be a formal way of interacting, but we do want you to be mindful of what you say and how it might come across. It is also important to choose your language carefully; some things can lead to a misunderstanding. 


The first time you will interact with your mentee will be via email. There are some examples in the appendices below (Appendix A) showing how to (and how not to) compose this first email. We are aware that sometimes mentors can be anxious about not being ‘good enough’ to mentor another student and feel they need to be outstanding to take on the role (this is certainly not the case!). 


Also, mentees can be worried about appearing ‘incapable’. Neither should be concerned and these are quite normal feelings. What is actually happening is that one student has asked for some guidance from an undergraduate who has already completed their current level of study, and the other student has said that they would like to allow a student to benefit from their experience – mistakes and successes!  Just be clear, friendly and to the point and don’t be afraid to say, ‘I don’t know’.


However, if you can help them find an alternative way to answer their question or concern, that would be great. You can always refer them back to the mentoring team and we will try to help or signpost them to an appropriate service if we can’t. It is enough that a mentor is willing to try and support another pupil.

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